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Utility Cost Analysis and Benchmarking

Many states are becoming deregulated markets. Depending on where your building is located, this could mean your organization has options in terms of where and how it buys utilities. Some buildings are even buying energy in small amounts (to cover one week, one month, etc.) in real time based upon pricing.

But how can you find ways to procure energy and work with utilities in a smart, cost-effective manner to save money and time?

It's possible to save money without reducing energy usage – and Shive-Hattery can show you how. By understanding and analyzing utility-buying options in this changing market, you can make smarter buying decisions that stretch your dollars.

How have you purchased energy in the last few years? What are your utility-purchasing options based upon where you're located? Would you benefit from renewable energy? Shive-Hattery experts can take an in-depth look at your bills and your utility situation, presenting cost-saving options you may not be aware of. For example, we helped one client realize the benefits of generating electricity onsite through a project that paid for itself in under three years – a much more lucrative alternative compared to purchasing energy from the local utility. There are always new possibilities to consider – and Shive-Hattery can help you find them.

We can’t predict the future of gas or electricity prices – they will always be uncertain. But our utility cost analysis and benchmarking services put you on the path to prepare your organization to handle changing market conditions.

It's amazing what can be uncovered in a utility cost and benchmarking analysis – even simple (but costly) mistakes, such as meter multipliers that are set up incorrectly.

Just like the metrics you put in place for your business to measure and compare performance to previous years, the same can be done with utilities. Having a benchmarking process in place can also help you verify how much of an impact an energy-efficiency initiative has once it's in place.
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